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CSVR Community Model: Intervening with Victims of Torture and CIDT in Kagiso, Gauteng
(Publications)

Masitha, Jabu, Dominique Dix-Peek, Modiegi Merafe, Kindiza Ngubeni and Tsamme Mfundisi. 2015. CSVR Community Model: Intervening with Victims of Torture and CIDT in Kagiso, Gauteng. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.

Finding our way: Developing a community work model for addressing torture. Danish Institute Against Torture Publication Series on Torture and Organised Violence No. 1
(Publications)

Bantjes, Megan, Malose Langa and Steffen Jensen. 2012. Finding our way: Developing a community work model for addressing torture. Danish Institute Against Torture Publication Series on Torture and Organised Violence No. 1. Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation and DIGNITY.CSVR and DIGNITY have engaged in systematic and critical reflection on how Theories of community intervention: Implications for the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation torture project, Appendix A to produce a theoretically informed model of community work for CSVR to address torture. In this report, we present how we arrived at an initial model through systematically combining practical experiences and theoretical inputs. It is in this sense that we talk about finding our way. The hope is that these inputs - and the process of putting them into concrete use in the model - might be of use and inspiration to other organisations. The full papers that fed into the chapters of this report are also available on the CSVR website.

Theories of community intervention: Implications for the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation torture project, Appendix AQuestions about community work, Appendix BHow others have done it: A desk study of community projects related to torture, Appendix CA methodological dilemma: The street corner approach versus an institutional approach to accessing victims of torture and CIDT, Appendix DWomen empowerment: A case study of a refugee women’s group at the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, Appendix EGuidelines for home visits, Appendix F

Theories of community intervention: Implications for the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation torture project, Appendix A
(Publications)

Bantjes, Megan. 2011. Theories of community intervention: Implications for the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation torture project, Appendix A. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.This paper was written with the aim of theoretically informing CSVR's model of community intervention with a specific focus on work done in the field of torture and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment. The document briefly reviews some of the better known theories and models of community work from psychology and social work. The objectives, principles and ethics which might guide CSVR in its community based torture work are outlined. Some conclusions are made about which theories would be most appropriate to inform the model.

Questions about community work, Appendix B
(Publications)

Jensen, Steffen and Megan Bantjes. 2011. Questions about community work, Appendix B. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.In order to produce a strategy for community work in CSVR's anti-torture project, it has been found useful to generate a set of questions or areas of interest that should be covered by future descriptions of interventions. These include questions about context, target group, theories of intervention, indicators and resources required. The questions are inspired by the RCT publication, An exploratory literature review on community interventions in four Latin American countries. These questions formed the framework for the model of community intervention related to torture outlined in Finding our way: Developing a community work model for addressing torture

How others have done it: A desk study of community projects related to torture, Appendix C
(Publications)

Bantjes, Megan. 2011. How others have done it: A desk study of community projects related to torture, Appendix C. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.With the aim of informing CSVR's development of a community work model to address torture and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment, this desk study examines six community projects conducted in South Africa and in other countries. Details of four of the interventions were found in the literature and information about two projects was gathered in interviews with the staff involved. Each intervention is discussed in terms of six questions that have been found useful for thinking about community work (see Questions about community work, Appendix B). The objectives of CSVR’s community work on torture - transformation, prevention and amelioration - provide the framework for considering the implications of each of these projects for CSVR's development of a model.

A methodological dilemma: The street corner approach versus an institutional approach to accessing victims of torture and CIDT, Appendix D
(Publications)

Langa, Malose. 2011. A methodological dilemma: The street corner approach versus an institutional approach to accessing victims of torture and CIDT, Appendix D. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.CSVR developed two research projects to identify and profile survivors of current torture and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment in the new South Africa. Two research methods were used to investigate patterns and effects of torture and victims’ access to medical, legal and psychosocial services - the street corner approach and the institutional approach. This report compares and contrasts the strengths and limitations of the institutional and street corner approaches as methods for accessing people who have been tortured recently in South Africa. This reflective report helped to inform the development of CSVR's model for community interventions to address torture detailed in Finding our way: Developing a community work model for addressing torture

Women empowerment: A case study of a refugee women’s group at the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, Appendix E
(Publications)

Langa, Malose. 2011. Women empowerment: A case study of a refugee women’s group at the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, Appendix E. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.This report evaluates CSVR's work with a group of refugee women affected by torture and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment. Over a period of six years, facilitators from CSVR met with a group of refugee women with the overall aim of facilitating the economic and social empowerment of these women and setting in motion increased integration into mainstream South African society. The intervention broke the stereotypes that cast refugee women as helpless victims who are in need of ‘hand-outs’ by galvanising their self-reliance and agency to form an organisation that will advocate for refugee rights and establish income-generating projects. This evaluation was conducted as part of the critical reflection process that fed into CSVR's development of a model for community intervention to address torture, detailed in Finding our way: Developing a community work model for addressing torture.

Guidelines for home visits, Appendix F
(Publications)

Langa, Malose. 2011. Guidelines for home visits, Appendix F. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.Home visits were undertaken as a stand-alone intervention as part of the CSVR's community project to address the psychosocial effects of torture among ex-combatants on the West Rand of Johannesburg. This report discusses the lessons, challenges and ethical dilemmas encountered in conducting home visits in 2008 and 2009. This evaluation process aimed to contribute to the development of a community intervention model for addressing torture, documented in Finding our way: Developing a community work model for addressing torture.

Profiling Torture II: Addressing Torture and its consequences in South Africa
(Publications)
Dix-Peek, D. and Bandeira, M. (2009 - Dec 2011). Profiling Torture II: Addressing Torture and its consequences in South Africa. Monitoring and Evaluation Progress Report - To End December 2011. Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.
Traumatic Stress Update (Volume 2 Number 2)
(Publications)

Dix-Peek, D. (2011). Traumatic Stress Update. Volume 2, Number 2, December 2011. Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.