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The Community Work Programme in Grabouw
(Publications)

Puwana, Zukiswa. 2015. The Community Work Programme in Grabouw. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.

A Follow-Up Report on the Community Work Programme in Bokfontein
(Publications)

Langa, Malose. 2015. A Follow-Up Report on the Community Work Programme in Bokfontein. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.

A Case Study of the Ivory Park Community Work Programme
(Publications)

Masuku, Themba. 2015. A Case Study of the Ivory Park Community Work Programme. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.

How others have done it: A desk study of community projects related to torture, Appendix C
(Publications)

Bantjes, Megan. 2011. How others have done it: A desk study of community projects related to torture, Appendix C. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.With the aim of informing CSVR's development of a community work model to address torture and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment, this desk study examines six community projects conducted in South Africa and in other countries. Details of four of the interventions were found in the literature and information about two projects was gathered in interviews with the staff involved. Each intervention is discussed in terms of six questions that have been found useful for thinking about community work (see Questions about community work, Appendix B). The objectives of CSVR’s community work on torture - transformation, prevention and amelioration - provide the framework for considering the implications of each of these projects for CSVR's development of a model.

Leaving the Gangster Things to the Boys Growing Up Now: Young Men, Physical Violence, and Structural Violence in Post-Transition South Africa
(Publications)

Brankovic, Jasmina. 2012. Leaving the Gangster Things to the Boys Growing Up Now: Young Men, Physical Violence, and Structural Violence in Post-Transition South Africa. Cape Town: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation and Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape.

This paper examines the intersection of physical violence, structural violence, and masculinity through the life history narrative of a 20-year-old man exiting an informal gang in Gugulethu, a township in Cape Town. Beginning and remaining with James Madoda’s narrative, the paper shows how the gendered physical violence between young men in townships emerges from historical and present-day structural violence - here defined as institutionalised power inequalities that limit life opportunities - and argues that structural violence needs to be discussed and addressed as a policy issue in South Africa. It also suggests that structural violence may provide a platform for collaboration among civil society actors working on socioeconomic transformation and the prevention of violence.

Traumatic Stress Update (Volume 2 Number 2)
(Publications)

Dix-Peek, D. (2011). Traumatic Stress Update. Volume 2, Number 2, December 2011. Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.

Responding to the Smoke that Calls: Principles of community-level interventions for the prevention of collective violence
(Publications)

Bandeira, M. & Higson-Smith, C. (2011). Responding to the Smoke that Calls: Principles of community-level interventions for the prevention of collective violence. A report for the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation and the Society, Work and Development Institute (of the University of the Witwatersrand).

The smoke that calls: Insurgent citizenship and the struggle for a place in the new South Africa
(Publications)
von Holdt, Karl., Langa, Malose., Malopo, Sepetla., Mogapi, Nomfundo., Ngubeni, Kindiza., Dlamini, Jacob., and Kirsten, Adèle.  2011. The smoke that calls: Insurgent citizenship and the struggle for a place in the new South Africa.  Centre for the Study of Violence and Society, Work and Development Institute. (1.8MB)
Dictating the local balance of power
(Publications)

Bruce, D. (2009). Dictating the local balance of power . Election-related violence in South Africa. (pdf 1.22Mb)

Why does South Africa have such high rates of violent crime?
(Publications)
Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation (CSVR). (April 2009). Why does South Africa have such high rates of violent crime? Supplement to the final report of the study on the violent nature of crime in South Africa. Produced by the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation (CSVR) for the Justice, Crime Prevention and Security (JCPS) cluster. Submitted to the Minister of Safety and Security