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How others have done it: A desk study of community projects related to torture, Appendix C
(Publications)

Bantjes, Megan. 2011. How others have done it: A desk study of community projects related to torture, Appendix C. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.With the aim of informing CSVR's development of a community work model to address torture and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment, this desk study examines six community projects conducted in South Africa and in other countries. Details of four of the interventions were found in the literature and information about two projects was gathered in interviews with the staff involved. Each intervention is discussed in terms of six questions that have been found useful for thinking about community work (see Questions about community work, Appendix B). The objectives of CSVR’s community work on torture - transformation, prevention and amelioration - provide the framework for considering the implications of each of these projects for CSVR's development of a model.

Leaving the Gangster Things to the Boys Growing Up Now: Young Men, Physical Violence, and Structural Violence in Post-Transition South Africa
(Publications)

Brankovic, Jasmina. 2012. Leaving the Gangster Things to the Boys Growing Up Now: Young Men, Physical Violence, and Structural Violence in Post-Transition South Africa. Cape Town: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation and Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape.

This paper examines the intersection of physical violence, structural violence, and masculinity through the life history narrative of a 20-year-old man exiting an informal gang in Gugulethu, a township in Cape Town. Beginning and remaining with James Madoda’s narrative, the paper shows how the gendered physical violence between young men in townships emerges from historical and present-day structural violence - here defined as institutionalised power inequalities that limit life opportunities - and argues that structural violence needs to be discussed and addressed as a policy issue in South Africa. It also suggests that structural violence may provide a platform for collaboration among civil society actors working on socioeconomic transformation and the prevention of violence.

Nongoloza's Children: Western Cape prison gangs during and after apartheid.
(Publications)

Steinberg, J. (2004). Nongoloza's Children: Western Cape prison gangs during and after apartheid. Monograph written for the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, July. Hard copies available on request from Maimuna Suliman at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Gangs, Pagad and the State: Vigilantism and Revenge Violence in the Western Cape
(Publications)

Dixon, B. & Johns, L. (2001). Gangs, Pagad and the State: Vigilantism and Revenge Violence in the Western Cape. Violence and Transition Series, Vol. 2, May. Hard copies available on request from Ntombifuthi Zondo at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The Era of the Jackrollers: Contextualising the rise of the youth gangs in Soweto
(Publications)

Mokwena, S. (1991). The Era of the Jackrollers: Contextualising the rise of the youth gangs in Soweto. Paper presented at the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, Seminar No. 7, 30 October.

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