Search
How others have done it: A desk study of community projects related to torture, Appendix C
(Publications)

Bantjes, Megan. 2011. How others have done it: A desk study of community projects related to torture, Appendix C. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.With the aim of informing CSVR's development of a community work model to address torture and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment, this desk study examines six community projects conducted in South Africa and in other countries. Details of four of the interventions were found in the literature and information about two projects was gathered in interviews with the staff involved. Each intervention is discussed in terms of six questions that have been found useful for thinking about community work (see Questions about community work, Appendix B). The objectives of CSVR’s community work on torture - transformation, prevention and amelioration - provide the framework for considering the implications of each of these projects for CSVR's development of a model.

The Power of Naming: ‘Senseless Violence’ and Violent Law in Post-Apartheid South Africa
(Publications)

Thomas, Kylie. 2012. The Power of Naming: ‘Senseless Violence’ and Violent Law in Post-Apartheid South Africa. Cape Town: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation and Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape.

This report focuses on vigilantism, on the practice of ‘necklacing’ as a form of punishment, and on police violence in South Africa post-apartheid. The report engages with a series of questions about how popular forms of justice are imagined and enacted and about what the persistence of forms of violent punishment that originated during apartheid signifies in South Africa today. The report explores some of the complex reasons why people understand violence to be a means for achieving justice. It considers issues related to collective violence, violence connected to service delivery protests, and violence widely understood by perpetrators, onlookers, and researchers to be punitive in intent. It contests the idea that such forms of violence are ‘senseless’, arguing that to do so is to evade the question of how violence is bound to the political order, both past and present.

As for Violent Crime that's our Daily Bread: Vigilante Violence during South Africa's Period of Transition
(Publications)

Harris, B. (2001). As for Violent Crime that's our Daily Bread: Vigilante Violence during South Africa's Period of Transition. Violence and Transition Series, Vol. 1, May. Hard copies available on request from Ntombifuthi Zondo at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Gangs, Pagad and the State: Vigilantism and Revenge Violence in the Western Cape
(Publications)

Dixon, B. & Johns, L. (2001). Gangs, Pagad and the State: Vigilantism and Revenge Violence in the Western Cape. Violence and Transition Series, Vol. 2, May. Hard copies available on request from Ntombifuthi Zondo at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Guardian or Gangster? Mapogo a Mathamaga: A case study
(Publications)

von Schnitzler, A., Ditlhage, G., Kgalema, L., Maepa, T., Mofokeng, T. & Pigou, P. (2001). Guardian or Gangster? Mapogo a Mathamaga: A case study. Violence and Transition Series, Vol. 3, May.

Vigilantes: A contemporary form of repression
(Publications)

Haysom, H. (1989). Vigilantes: A contemporary form of repression. Paper presented at the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, Seminar No. 4, 25 May.

Read more