Brankovic, Jasmina. Roht-Arriaza, Naomi. 2013. African Union Transitional Justice Policy Framework in Practice: Implementing Accountability Measures. Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation: Cape Town.

Hamilton, Leigh and Van der Merwe, Hugo.  2013.  Peace, Justice and Accountability after War and Dictatorship Prospects for the African Context : Workshop Report 7-8 March, Cape Town, South Africa. Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation: Cape Town

Thomas, Kylie. 2013. Homophobia, Injustice and ‘Corrective Rape’ in Post-Apartheid South Africa. Cape Town: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation and Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape.

This report offers a critique of the terms ‘corrective rape’ and ‘curative rape’ and argues for careful and nuanced application of the concept of ‘hate crimes’. The report focuses on a particular, individual life history and experience of trauma. It also argues for understanding gender‐based violence as structural violence.

Thomas, Kylie. 2012. The Power of Naming: ‘Senseless Violence’ and Violent Law in Post-Apartheid South Africa. Cape Town: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation and Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape.

This report focuses on vigilantism, on the practice of ‘necklacing’ as a form of punishment, and on police violence in South Africa post-apartheid. The report engages with a series of questions about how popular forms of justice are imagined and enacted and about what the persistence of forms of violent punishment that originated during apartheid signifies in South Africa today. The report explores some of the complex reasons why people understand violence to be a means for achieving justice. It considers issues related to collective violence, violence connected to service delivery protests, and violence widely understood by perpetrators, onlookers, and researchers to be punitive in intent. It contests the idea that such forms of violence are ‘senseless’, arguing that to do so is to evade the question of how violence is bound to the political order, both past and present.

Maringira, Godfrey, with Jasmina Brankovic. 2013. The Persistence of Military Identities Among Ex-combatants in South Africa. Cape Town: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation and Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape.

This report focuses on the ways in which ex-combatants have remained militarised at both an individual and a collective level in post-apartheid South Africa. It argues that ex-combatants’ military identities and skills can be both beneficial and detrimental to their families, communities and the state. For this reason, as long as DDRR programmes remain short-term processes aimed chiefly at disarming ex-combatants without addressing their ongoing needs in highly unequal and violent societies, the demilitarisation of ex-combatants’ minds and everyday lives will be an unattainable goal.

Van der Merwe, Hugo, Nicky Rousseau, Naana Marekia, Pamela Machakanja and Eunice Bere. 2013. Opportunities and Challenges of South-South Partnership: Reflections on a Collaborative Research Project on Violence and Transition in Africa. Cape Town: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, Centre for Humanities Research at University of the Western Cape, Institute for Peace, Leadership and Governance at Africa University and Nairobi Peace Initiative-Africa, 2013.

This report reflects on the experience of four South-based organisations in conducting collaborative research on violence and transition in Africa. It explores some of the challenges and opportunities offered by working collaboratively on common themes across different contexts with research partners with diverse goals and institutional arrangements, and seeks to draw some lessons for how such partnerships can benefit individual organisations and research on violence more generally. The report is based on the final project meeting where partners engaged in a joint reflection on more than three years of collaboration.

 

Brankovic, Jasmina. 2012. Leaving the Gangster Things to the Boys Growing Up Now: Young Men, Physical Violence, and Structural Violence in Post-Transition South Africa. Cape Town: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation and Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape.

This paper examines the intersection of physical violence, structural violence, and masculinity through the life history narrative of a 20-year-old man exiting an informal gang in Gugulethu, a township in Cape Town. Beginning and remaining with James Madoda’s narrative, the paper shows how the gendered physical violence between young men in townships emerges from historical and present-day structural violence - here defined as institutionalised power inequalities that limit life opportunities - and argues that structural violence needs to be discussed and addressed as a policy issue in South Africa. It also suggests that structural violence may provide a platform for collaboration among civil society actors working on socioeconomic transformation and the prevention of violence.

Freemantle, I.   Towards Improving Forced Migrants’ Access to Health and Psychosocial Rights in Urban South Africa. (Nov 2011).  Meeting report: Policy Dialogue, 30 November 2011, University of the Witwatersrand, co-hosted by the African Centre for Migration & Society, Witsand and the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.