Title: Two New Reviews of ‘The Global Climate Regime and Transitional Justice’ Available

Authors: Sonja Klinsky and Jasmina Brankovic

 

Two new reviews have been published of ‘The Global Climate Regime and Transitional Justice,’ by Sonja Klinsky and Jasmina Brankovic.

In the International & Comparative Law Quarterly, Ottavio Quirico writes, “Klinsky and Brankovic comprehensively apply transitional justice principles to climate change regulation. Their analysis discloses thought-provoking insights, necessarily de lege ferenda, and provides ground-breaking suggestions for further developing specific substantive and procedural regulation.” For the full book review, click here.

In the Carbon & Climate Law Review, Jonathan Pickering writes, “The authors are to be commended for presenting a fresh, thought-provoking and informed perspective on the political and legal dimensions of climate justice. The book offers a valuable contribution to the emerging literature on how climate justice could achieve the transition from ideal to reality.” For the full book review, click here.

‘The Global Climate Regime and Transitional Justice’ was published in 2018 as part of the Routledge Advances in Climate Change Research Series. It examines the potential of transitional justice insights to inform global climate governance. Laying out core structural similarities between current global climate governance tensions and transitional justice contexts, it explores how transitional justice approaches and mechanisms could be productively applied in the climate change context. These include responsibility mechanisms such as amnesties, legal accountability measures, and truth commissions, as well as reparations and institutional reform. The book then steps beyond reformist transitional justice practice to consider more transformative approaches, and uses this to explore a wider set of possibilities for the climate context.

Each chapter presents one or more concrete proposals arrived at by using ideas from transitional justice and applying them to the justice tensions central to the global climate context. By combining these two fields the book provides a new framework through which to understand the challenges of addressing harms and strengthening collective climate action. This book will be of great interest to scholars and practitioners of climate change and transitional justice.

global son edits

Copyright © 2019 CSVR. All Rights Reserved.