The Indirect Effects of Political Violence on Children: Does Violence Beget Violence?

The Indirect Effects of Political Violence on Children: Does Violence Beget Violence?

This paper addresses itself to the concerns that have been voiced about the effect of years of exposure to high levels of political violence on South Africa's children. It responds to evidence that exposure to violence causes short-term psychological suffering and concerns that it may have more fundamental consequences for their psychological development and future behaviour.

 

The Indirect Effects of Political Violence on Children
Kerry Gibson
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Kerry Gibson is a South African-New Zealand clinical psychologist and academic, specialising in youth mental health. She is, at the time of writing, currently the Deputy Head of School (Academic) for the School of Psychology at the University of Auckland.

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